Alfred Hitchcock The Masterpiece Collection
Everyone knows that the legendary Alfred Hitchcock is the "Master of Suspense". He has directed some of cinema's most thrilling and recognizable classics. This release is definitely the definitive collection and it showcases Alfred Hitchcock's true cinematic talent.

This ultimate box set is jam-packed with 14 classic Hitchcock films including 13 that have never been released on Blu-Ray. Each film has been digitally restored from high resolution film elements in order to guarantee the ultimate Hitchcock experience.

These films feature some of the best talent and performances that Hollywood has to offer, including James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Cary Grant, Julie Andrews, Paul Newman, Janet Leigh, Anthony Perkins, Tippi Hedren, Eva Marie Saint, Kim Novak, John Forsythe, Bruce Dern, Karen Black, Priscilla Lane and even Sean Connery. If 14 amazing Hitchcock films in high definition isn't enough this release also includes over 15 hours of bonus features including a newly produced documentary for "The Birds".

14 x BD50 | 1080p AVC, 1080p VC-1 | 1621 min | 530 Gb + 3% rec
Language & Subtitles: see below
Genre: Crime, Drama, Comedy, Horror, Mystery, Romance, Thriller, War



Saboteur (1942)

Saboteur (1942)

Hitchcock's answer to World War II propaganda took on his most beloved subject: mistaken identity. Many of his later movies with this same theme would go on to be considered classics, like 'North by Northwest.' In 'Saboteur' Hitchcock shows flashes of brilliance, but it's plain to see that this isn't the best work he would go on to produce. 'Saboteur' showed that Hitchcock was going to be capable of great things.

Barry Kane (Robert Cummings) is the man in question. One day he's a simple factory employee putting together airplanes for the war effort and the next thing he knows he's the subject of a statewide manhunt on charges of espionage.

Before a raging fire breaks out at the factory, Barry runs into a strange man who drops a few envelops on the ground along with a $100 bill. He's curious about the man, but doesn't think anything of it. Then the fire ignites and Barry tries to help a friend by handing him a fire extinguisher. Only the extinguisher is full of gasoline and his friend goes up in a wall of flame. Barry is soon blamed as the saboteur and the police set out to catch him. Barry realizes that the man he met before the fire started knows more than he's letting on, so he sets out on a Richard Kimball-like crusade to clear his name and find out who is trying to set him up.

Language: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America)
Subtitles: English SDH, French, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America), Portuguese, Japanese, German, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Italian, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish

Extras:

Saboteur: A Closer Look (SD, 35 minutes): Actor Norman Lloyd and associate art director Robert Boyle discuss the film and share memories from the production. Hitchcock's daughter Pat Hitchcock O'Connell also appears, but only briefly.

Storyboards (SD, 4 minutes): Original storyboards for the Statue of Liberty sequence.

Alfred Hitchcock's Sketches (SD, 1 minute): A small selection of drawings and storyboards from the director.

Production Photographs (SD, 8 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads and production photos, many of them featuring Hitchcock himself.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 2 minutes)


Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

'Shadow of a Doubt' starts off intriguingly enough. A nameless man lies on a bed, despondent and detached. He's being followed by two shadowy figures standing just outside his apartment. He's able to lose them in the streets, but they'll be back.

The man soon boards a train and heads out west. He's going to visit family. We don't know why he's running, but those shadowy men look like they're up to no good. We soon learn the man's name is Charles Oakley (Joseph Cotton). Like so many Hitchcock characters, Charles is a man with secrets. Secrets that become more and more apparent as the movie progresses.

Charles has family out west. His sister lives there with her husband and a few children. They're an idyllic bunch, living in the suburbs. However, seeing that the Master of Suspense is at work, they certainly can't stay a peaceful suburb family for long. Uncle Charlie is coming and he's bringing whatever trouble he's in with him.

The main lead in the movie, besides Uncle Charlie, is his niece who is also named Charlie (Teresa Wright). Young Charlie is a spunky, youthful type who is infatuated with her uncle. She's completely enamored with him. She hangs on his every word and adores just about everything about him.

Language: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America)
Subtitles: English SDH, French, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America), Portuguese, Japanese, German, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Italian, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish

Extras:

Beyond Doubt: The Making of Hitchcock's Favorite Film (SD, 35 minutes): Hitchcock's daughter Pat Hitchcock O'Connell, associate art director Robert Boyle, and actors Teresa Wright (Charlie Newton) and Hume Cronyn (Herb Hawkins) reminisce about the film, while filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich chimes in with observations and insight into the characters, themes, story and unique place in Hitchcock's canon.

Production Drawings (SD, 6 minutes): A series of original drawings from Boyle's sketchbook.

Production Photographs (SD, 9 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads and production photos.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 1 minute)


Rope (1948)

Rope (1948)

Rope would be a mere gimmick movie if it didn’t have such a rich screenplay. The film, based on a play by Patrick Hamilton (Gaslight), consists of only ten camera shots, edited to imply a single, unedited take. (Cameras only held about ten minutes of footage back in 1948).

Brandon (John Dall) is a sociopath and a psychopath. Phillip (Farley Granger) is caught in Brandon's wake, unable to escape. It's implied that the two are partners, yet it's never stated outright in the movie, simply because of the time period in which the movie was released. Brandon almost has complete control over Phillip. He works him like a puppet, fulfilling his need to manipulate people for his own enjoyment.

Brandon and Phillip have just killed one of their close friends. That's how the movie opens. We hear a man's scream, the camera swings in through an apartment window and there we see David (Dick Hogan) being strangled to death, with a rope, by two of his former schoolmates. Only we don't know any of this information yet. All we see is a man dying and two men committing the act. After it's done, both are visibly shaken, but for different reasons...

Language: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America)
Subtitles: English SDH, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish

Extras:

Rope Unleashed (SD, 32 minutes): Alfred Hitchcock's writing collaborator, Hume Cronyn, discusses forming the screenplay with Hitchcock. He talks about writing scenes with him and how they changed certain scenes from the play to work better in the film. Screenwriter Arthur Laurents discusses his work on the film. He also talks about how tough it was to adapt an English play for American audiences. He discusses the homosexual undertones and how it was difficult to translate the class system differences in England to American understanding.
The documentary is notable for Laurents' criticism of the final cut. The screenwriter grumbles about decisions made by Hitchcock and the cast, complains about several performances, gripes about changes made to his script, and explains how his version of the film would have played out differently.

Production Photographs (SD, 8 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads and production photos.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 2 minutes)


Rear Window (1954)

Rear Window (1954)

Rear Window might just be a perfect film. If not a perfect film, then perfect Hitchcock. It's impossible to draw a line between the mystery and the suspense, the story and the setting, or the performances and John Michael Hayes' dialogue. A melting pot of paranoia, isolation and the very real threat of murder most foul, it teases and toys, accelerates and tiptoes, delights and surprises, shocks and scares. It's Hitchcock at his peak. Hitchcock at his most playful. Hitchcock at his most devious.

James Stewart plays a photographer temporarily confined to a wheelchair who spends his lazy days spying on his neighbors out the window, one of whom (Raymond Burr) appears to have just killed his wife. As the circumstantial evidence mounts, so does Stewart’s determination to find tangible proof of the crime, but he’s forced to watch impotently from his apartment as his debutante girlfriend Grace Kelly puts herself in harm’s way for him.

Rear Window is without a doubt one of Hitchcock's best and an undisputed masterwork that belongs in any box set that dares call itself a Masterpiece Collection.

Language: English, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish
Subtitles: English, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish

Extras:

Audio Commentary: Author John Farwell ("Hitchcock's Rear Window: The Well-Made Film") provides a somewhat dry but undeniably detailed analysis of Rear Window, without so much as missing a shot or scene.

Rear Window Ethics: Remembering and Restoring a Hitchcock Classic (SD, 55 minutes): From short story to screenplay to Hitchcock masterpiece, track the development, casting, production, performances, style and, eventually, the restoration of Rear Window.

Masters of Cinema (SD, 34 minutes): A lengthy "Masters of Cinema" interview with Hitchcock that, despite its age, is one of the must-see extras in the 14-disc Masterpiece Collection set.

A Conversation with Screenwriter John Michael Hayes (SD, 13 minutes): Hayes covers a lot of ground, touching on his first meeting with Hitchcock, his first days on the job, his take on the director, his impressions of Stewart and Kelly, and more.

Pure Cinema: Through the Eyes of the Master (SD, 25 minutes): An in-depth, career-spanning look at Hitchcock's filmmaking prowess, desires as a director, contributions to cinema, and influence on generations of filmmakers that followed. "Pure Cinema" doesn't focus on Rear Window, but it's no less welcome.

Breaking Barriers: The Sound of Hitchcock (SD, 24 minutes): Hitchcock had a penchant for unforgettable visuals, but his meticulous mastery of sound was just as crucial to the impact, suspense, dread and mood of his films.

Hitchcock-Truffaut Interview Excerpts (SD, 16 minutes): Excerpts from filmmaker Francois Truffaut's 1962 interview sessions with Hitchcock (for his book, the aptly titled "Hitchcock") are set to a montage of clips and stills from the film.

Production Photographs (SD, 3 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads and production photos.

Theatrical and Re-Release Trailers (HD, 9 minutes)


The Trouble with Harry (1955)

The Trouble with Harry (1955)

Most of us remember Hitchcock for his mastery of cinematic suspense. His ability to weave a tale of murder and intrigue is unparalleled. Sometimes we forget that Hitchcock also tried his hand at other genres. Like comedy. Sure, there's still a murder in 'The Trouble with Harry,' but people aren't running around afraid for their lives. Instead, everyone who comes in contact with the dead man in the hills is completely fine with the fact that he's dead.

'The Trouble with Harry' is about an entire town of people who are curiously blase about a corpse, named Harry, who suddenly pops up on the outskirts of their little hamlet. They each have their reasons, and the plot eventually twists and turns enough that Harry is buried and then dug up four times over the course of the film, but that particular irony is the driving force of the movie, and makes 'The Trouble with Harry' feel like a bit of a trifle.

'The Trouble with Harry' is a nice change of pace from the overall tenseness of this set. The great majority of the films in 'The Masterpiece Collection' are top-notch thrillers that weren't made for laughs. Here we get to see a lighter side of the Master of Suspense, and surprise, surprise, he nails that too.

Language: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America)
Subtitles: English SDH, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Japanese, German, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Italian, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish

Extras:

The Trouble with Harry Isn't Over (SD, 32 minutes): "Frankly I don't care what you do with Harry as long as you don't bring him back to life!" Hitchcock's daughter Pat Hitchcock O'Connell returns for another documentary, this time with associate producer Herbert Coleman, screenwriter John Michael Hayes and actor John Forsythe (Sam Marlowe), to extensive ends. Topics covered include Paramount's initial resistance in financing the picture, the director's left turn into black comedy, the crucial role of his wife in his career, the casting of Shirley MacLaine and her co-stars (among them Harry's corpse), the film's mid-production weather troubles and subsequent challenges, the incorporation of music, Hitch's collaboration with Bernard Herrmann and more.

Production Photographs (SD, 6 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads and production photos.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 2 minutes)


The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

Hitchcock didn't make a habit of repeating himself, but that didn't stop him from bringing two different versions of The Man Who Knew Too Much to the screen: the first in 1934, which the Master of Suspense later likened to "the work of a talented amateur," and the second in 1956, which he touted as being "made by a professional." Neither film represents Hitchcock at his best, though, despite the fact that the 1956 remake (reimagining really) remains the superior thriller.

While vacationing in Morocco the MacKenna family is thrust into a game of political intrigue that they aren't ready to handle. They soon befriend a nice Frenchman named Loius Bernard (Daniel Gelin) who appears a little suspicious, but is still welcomed by Ben with open arms. The MacKenna's also meet the Draytons, another vacationing couple. Although, Jo soon points out that she feels like these happenstance meetings don't feel like coincidences.

The next day, while the MacKennas explore a nearby market, they witness a murder. The murdered man is their friend Louis. Before he dies he whispers the details of an assassination plot to Ben. In that very moment Ben has gone from an innocent bystander to a man who knows far too much, as the title suggests.

Language: English, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish
Subtitles: English, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish

Extras:

The Making of The Man Who Knew Too Much (SD, 34 minutes): "Let's say the first version is the work of a talented amateur and the second was made by a professional." After a lengthy overview of Hitchcock's reluctance and eventual decision to remake his own 1934 film of the same name, Pat Hitchcock O'Connell, associate producer Herbert Coleman, screenwriter John Michael Hayes, production designer Henry Bumstead and other notable participants leave no stone unturned, laying out Man's plotting and script, Jimmy Stewart's friendship with Hitchcock, his casting in the movie, his castmates' performances (chief among them Doris Day) and just about everything else a fan of Htich's thriller might want to know.

Production Photographs (SD, 4 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads and production photos.

Theatrical and Re-Release Trailers


Vertigo (1958)

Vertigo (1958)

'Vertigo' was recently voted the number one film of all time in BFI Sight and Sound's poll, which routinely polls a wide variety of well-respected critics asking them to cast votes on which movies are the best of the best. Until now ''Citizen Kane'' had long held the top spot.

'Vertigo' remains among the very top of Hitchcock's eminent catalog of films. It's a film about love, greed, and obsession; a movie that dives into the psyche of a man tortured by the thought of losing his true love; a movie that shines some light on how Hitchcock himself viewed his leading ladies.

Scottie (James Stewart) is a flawed man, physically and emotionally. He's got a paralyzing fear of heights and appears to be driven completely by the whims of his most base emotions. He transforms from an analytical detective to a maniac driven by lust, eschewing all rational thought because he's convinced himself he's fallen in love with a mysterious woman.

The woman is Madeline (Kim Novak). Madeline is a striking blonde, just the way Hitchcock liked them. Apparently, Scottie feels the exact same way. Scottie, now retired from the police force, is asked by a personal friend to keep an eye on his wife. He fears that his wife is possessed and he doesn't know if she's being safe when she goes out on her long, mysterious trips. Scottie reluctantly agrees...

Language: English, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish
Subtitles: English, Czech, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish

Extras:

Audio Commentary: This commentary is provided by director William Friedkin. Friedkin is interesting enough to listen to, but he does have a tendency to simply describe what is happening on screen which gets a little tedious after a while.

Obsessed with Vertigo: New Life for Hitchcock's Masterpiece (SD, 29 minutes): Film restorers Robert A. Harris and James C. Katz discuss why it was so difficult to restore 'Vertigo.' They talk about the different steps they had to take in restoring the movie's original elements and what bad shape those elements were in to begin with. Among those who sit down to talk about the film are filmmaker Martin Scorsese, Hitch's daughter Pat Hitchcock O'Connell, associate producer Herbert Coleman, screenwriter Samuel Taylor and actresses Kim Novak (Madeleine/Judy) and Barbara Bel Geddes (Midge).

Partners in Crime: Hitchcock's Collaborations (SD, 55 minutes): This feature is broken up into four separate parts, with each part focusing on a Hitchcock crew regular. There's a featurette about Edith Head, costume designer, one about composer Bernard Hermann, another about titles designer Saul Bass, and finally one about Hitchcock's wife, Alma Reville.

Hitchcock and Truffaut Interview Excerpts (SD, 14 minutes): Excerpts from filmmaker Francois Truffaut's 1962 interview sessions with Hitchcock (for his book, the aptly titled "Hitchcock") are set to a montage of clips and stills from the film.

100 Years of Universal: The Lew Wasserman Era (HD, 9 minutes): Super agent turned visionary Lew Wasserman put power (and opportunity) in his actors' pockets and changed the business, all before purchasing the Paramount library, bringing Hitchcock to television and, ultimately, acquiring a major studio. That studio? Universal.

Foreign Censorship Ending (SD, 2 minutes): An extended ending tacked on for the film's overseas release.

The Vertigo Archives (SD, 69 minutes): Art director Henry Bumstead's sprawling production portfolio drawings.

Theatrical and Restoration Trailers (SD, 4 minutes)


Psycho (1960)

Psycho (1960)

There are only two eras in the history of cinema: before Psycho, and after Psycho. Alfred Hitchcock, who helped define so many of the genre tropes we still use today, utterly annihilated them in this adaptation of Robert Bloch’s novel, bringing overt sexuality, graphic violence and a complete disregard for storytelling structure into the mainstream for the first time.

The result was a roaring success: a terrifying and expertly crafted thriller about a woman (Janet Leigh) on the run with $40,000 who wanders into another movie altogether when she stops off at the Bates Motel, and gets carved up in the shower by the homicidal mother of Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins).

Psycho is one of those films which has so entered the public consciousness that even people who haven't actually seen the film feel like they have.

Language: English, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish
Subtitles: English, Czech, Hungarian, Icelandic, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish

Extras:

Audio Commentary – Stephen Rebello, author of 'Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho', provides an informative, well-paced, and interesting commentary that never lapses into plot summation and analysis. In an easygoing style, he discusses various aspects of the picture's production, shares on-set anecdotes, compares the movie to the novel upon which it's based, and points out where various cuts and deletions occurred. He examines the censorship issues the film faced, talks about Hitchcock's fascination with birds, notes a number of subtleties that aren't immediately apparent, addresses the film's lukewarm critical reception, and mentions that 'Psycho' haunted Hitchcock for the remainder of his life.

The Making of 'Psycho' (SD, 94 minutes) – Comprehensive and absorbing are the best adjectives to describe this 1997 documentary that's almost as long as the film itself. Lots of firsthand recollections from principal cast and crew members give us an insider's perspective on working with Hitchcock and the particulars of the production. Janet Leigh's memories are especially vivid (she talks glowingly about Anthony Perkins – his talent, sense of humor, and friendship), as are those of Hitchcock's daughter, Pat, who played a small comedic role in the film. Topics such as casting, wardrobe, censorship, editing, sound effects, and music are examined, as well as public and critical reaction to what was a very unique entertainment back in 1960. Any 'Psycho' fan would be crazy to miss this absorbing, well-made documentary.

Psycho Sound (HD, 10 minutes) – This all-new featurette looks at how the 5.1 mix for 'Psycho' was developed from the film's original elements. Comparisons between the original mono track and the new 5.1 mix demonstrate the enhancements.

In the Master's Shadow: Hitchcock's Legacy (SD, 26 minutes) – Martin Scorsese, John Carpenter, William Friedkin, and other motion picture professionals and historians recall their initial Hitchcock experience and how it affected them in this absorbing 2008 featurette. They also examine and analyze the director's style, his subtleties, and how he refined his own influences and expanded upon them. Clips from a slew of Hitchcock films illustrate the master's command of the medium, while excerpts from more modern fare show how acclaimed directors like Spielberg, De Palma, and Scorsese borrowed and paid homage to him. One of the most fascinating sequences juxtaposes the shower scene in 'Psycho' against a fight sequence in 'Raging Bull' that was modeled after it shot by shot.

Hitchcock/Truffaut (HD, 15 minutes) – Also new to this release, excerpts from audio tapes of director Francois Truffaut's legendary 1962 interviews with Hitchcock, conducted in preparation for a book, focus on 'Psycho' and Hitchcock's perspective on the movie's structure and narrative. Clips and stills from the film accompany the audio. It's rare to hear a director from Hitchcock's generation discuss his own work, so this intelligent dialogue is a real treat.

Newsreel Footage: The Release of 'Psycho' (SD, 8 minutes) – Footage of crowds lining up to see the film in New York, as well as an examination of 'Psycho's rules and regs (no admittance after the film begins, don't reveal the ending) and its unique ticket policy distinguish this promotional short.

The Shower Scene: With and Without Music (SD, 3 minutes) – The title says it all. The scene is presented in its original form and without Bernard Herrmann's score. The lack of music intensifies the violence and horror, and makes the sequence seem even more gruesome.

The Shower Sequence: Storyboards by Saul Bass (SD, 4 minutes) – A collection of black-and-white sketches outlining the classic scene.

The 'Psycho' Archives (SD, 8 minutes) – A slew of production photos, scene shots, and on-set candids – all of which scroll by much too slowly – comprise this skippable supplement.

Posters and 'Psycho' Ads (SD, 3 minutes) – Posters from a variety of countries, as well as several newspaper advertisements are included for perusal. These, too, scroll by at a snail's pace.

Lobby Cards (SD, 2 minutes) – Browse through several color lobby cards here.

Behind the Scenes Photographs (SD, 8 minutes) – Still shots of Hitchcock, his actors, and his crew make up this comprehensive collection of on-set photos.

Publicity Shots (SD, 8 minutes) – More black-and-white stills, many of which were used to advertise and hype the film. Some of the screaming shots of Leigh and Miles are quite amusing.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 7 minutes) – Hitchcock himself "hosts" this non-traditional preview, designed as a tour of the Bates property. The lighthearted approach belies the film's sinister nature.

Re-Release Trailers (SD, 2 minutes) – These five trailers of varying length hype "the version of 'Psycho' TV didn't show."

Lamb To The Slaughter (27 minutes) - a short film, based on Roald Dahl's novel, about a man and a woman who must part ways.


The Birds (1963)

The Birds (1963)

Hitchcock was far more interested in the human monster than the supernatural sort, which should warn anyone new to The Birds that Hitchcock's stab at the subgenre is anything but a conventional monster movie. Deceptively minimalistic -- "birds attack small town" doesn't even begin to cover it -- the critically hailed classic is one of the director's most tailored and refined. No small feat considering the director originally wanted Grace Kelly and Cary Grant as Melanie and Mitch, roles that would eventually go to Tippi Hedren and Rod Taylor, or that the production wasn't short on obstacles and challenges, both technical and personal. The story isn't even the draw. That honor falls to the mystery of it all. Why are the birds attacking? Are they a punishing force? A manifestation of chaos? An agent of something more sinister? Or simply nature unleashed? Why does their frenzy center around Melanie? And just what are we to make of the film's final minutes, one of the most suspenseful scenes Hitchcock committed to film? Ambiguity, sharp dialogue and a near-unbearable lack of answers make The Birds horror at its finest, and every second holds viewers on the edges of their seats. Will the birds' bloodlust be satiated? Will the town turn on Melanie? Even if she escapes, will it be the end of the attacks? Questions, questions, questions. Don't dare watch The Birds only once. Take it in, savor it, dissect it and watch it all over again.

Language: English, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish
Subtitles: English, Czech, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish

Extras:

The Birds: Hitchcock's Monster Movie (HD, 14 minutes): The only Blu-ray exclusive in The Masterpiece Collection amounts to a terrific but somewhat short analysis of The Birds' place in horror movie history, Hitchcock's attraction to the project, the mystery behind the avian monsters' attack, the birds as a manifestation of disharmony and disruption, and the film's ambiguous ending.

All About The Birds (SD, 80 minutes): Rather than the retrospective analysis of the newly produced "Hitchcock's Monster Movie," this excellent DVD-era documentary pulls back the curtain on the production, from its inspiration to its development, scripting, story elements, characters, performances, special effects and more.

Hitchcock-Truffaut Interview Excerpts (SD, 14 minutes): Excerpts from filmmaker Francois Truffaut's 1962 interview sessions with Hitchcock (for his book, the aptly titled "Hitchcock") are set to a montage of clips and stills from the film.

Deleted Scene and Original Ending (SD, 8 minutes): A deleted scene comprised of script pages and production photographs followed by an alternate ending, comprised of script pages and sketches.

Storyboards (SD, 24 minutes): A lengthy storyboard/still comparison reel.

Tippi Hedren's Screen Test (SD, 10 minutes): Hedren's screen test, with audible instructions from Hitchcock.

100 Years of Universal: Restoring the Classics (HD, 9 minutes): Rather than a Birds-centric restoration featurette, this is a general catalog-wide catch-all. It's appreciated, but not nearly as revealing as it could be.

100 Years of Universal: The Lot (HD, 9 minutes): The Universal backlot in all its glory.

The Birds is Coming (SD, 1 minute): A Universal international newsreel highlighting pigeon races with special guest Alfred Hitchcock and actress Tippi Hedren.

Suspense Story: National Press Club Hears Hitchcock (SD, 2 minutes): Another Universal international newsreel.

Production Photographs (SD, 14 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads, production photos and more.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 5 minutes)


Marnie (1964)

Marnie (1964)

'Marnie' is based on a novel of the same name by Winston Graham. Its main character is an elegant thief named Marnie, played by Tippi Hedren, fresh off her introductory starring role in 'The Birds.' Marnie takes on many aliases as she rips off business after business. She poses as a beautiful job applicant in need of work in the payroll departments. When she's finally established herself as a trustworthy employee she steals as much money from the company's safe as she can, then she moves on to the next mark.

It may seem simple, but Marnie's life is anything but. She's a thief, yes. She's able to pull off her scores using a combination of cunning and sexuality, luring men into a false sense of security. Most men fall for it, but not Mark Rutland. He's suspicious from the beginning when he witnesses Marnie applying for a job in his company. He's sure he's seen her somewhere and he's had business associates who have been robbed recently. Mark plays along though because he's intrigued by her beauty and captivated by her boldness.
Once Mark pieces it together the movie soon turns into a psycho-sexual struggle between the two of them.

Language: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America)
Subtitles: English SDH, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish

Extras:

The Trouble with Marnie (SD, 58 minutes): "One might call Marnie a sex mystery. That is, if one used such words." Hitch's daughter Pat Hitchcock O'Donnell, Marnie contributors and treatment writers Joseph Stefano (Psycho) and Evan Hunter (The Birds), screenwriter Jay Presson Allen, unit production manager Hilton A. Green, production designer Robert Boyle, author Robin Wood ("Hitchcock's Films Revisited"), filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich, and actresses Tippi Hedren (Marnie Edgar), Diane Baker (Lil Mainwaring) and Louise Latham (Bernice Edgar) dive into Marnie, from its adaptation and script development to its Hunter-disputed rape scene, psychological unravelings, flashbacks, violence, expressionist devices, and its reception and legacy.

The Marnie Archives (SD, 9 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads and production photos.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 5 minutes). The theatrical trailer is included with a great introduction by Hitchcock.


Torn Curtain (1966)

Torn Curtain (1966)

Nowadays our espionage thrillers are full of car chases, explosions, and highly choreographed fight scenes. Rarely do our theaters see the likes of something akin to Alfred Hitchcock's 'Torn Curtain' where double agents and espionage are treated with more of a cloak-and-dagger feel.

Professor Michael Armstrong (Paul Newman) is living the life of a reluctant double agent. The nuclear arms race between the Americans and the Germans has hit fever-pitch. Armstrong claims to be working on a missile defense technology that would render nuclear warheads obsolete. However, he says that the Americans don't want this type of technology around because they need the imminent threat of their missiles to scare other nations. So, Armstrong defects to Germany.

The tension slowly builds as the Germans begin to realize that Armstrong may not be the defector they were led to believe. Armstrong finds himself trapped between two worlds, trying to keep his stories straight as he tries desperately to find the information that he came to Germany for in the first place.

Language: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America)
Subtitles: English SDH, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish

Extras:

Torn Curtain Rising (SD, 32 minutes): A great, informational documentary about Hitchcock making 'Torn Curtain.' There's also a wealth of information provided that talks about the origin of the story, Hitchcock working with Paul Newman and how Newman wanted script changes, and how the movie was accepted by audiences and critics.

Scenes Scored by Bernard Herrmann (SD, 14 minutes): View scenes with music cues and arrangements from Bernard Herrmann's original score (among them the murder sequence), composed before he was replaced by John Addison.

Production Photographs (SD, 22 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads, production photos and more.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 3 minutes)


Topaz (1969)

Topaz (1969)

'Topaz' feels like Hitchcock's answer to James Bond. The entire movie, from its globe-hopping escapades to its varied clandestine activities, feels like an old-school Bond flick. There isn't a character as notable as Bond in the movie, but the entire thing has that aura of Cold War espionage.

There's a lot going on in 'Topaz.' Along the lines with the Bond parallels, 'Topaz' also feels like a spy thriller that John Le Carre would pen. It's convoluted, filled with shadowy double agents double-crossing their friends and countrymen for their own personal gain. It's also a topical film, taking in context the threat of the Soviet Union, revolution in Cuba, and the looming Cuban Missile Crisis.

Michael Nordstrom (John Forsythe) is a U.S. intelligence agent who has just taken a high-ranking Soviet official into custody. The official is willing to defect to the United States as long as they can protect him from people that will want him dead. Nordstrom is determined to get as much information from the defector as possible, which reveals a top-secret group of rogue agents in France operating under the code name Topaz.

Language: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America)
Subtitles: English SDH, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish

Extras:

'Topaz' An Appreciation by Leonard Maltin (SD, 29 minutes): Film critic and historian Leonard Maltin discusses Hitchcock's prolific filmmaking. The most interesting aspect of this retrospective about the movie is Maltin talking about Hitchcock's difficulty trying to follow up his success of 'Psycho' with his later films of the 60s.

Alternate Endings (SD, 6 minutes): There are three alternate endings included.

Storyboards: The Mendozas (SD, 12 minutes): A storyboards-to-stills comparison reel.

Production Photographs (SD, 6 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads and production photos.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 3 minutes)


Frenzy (1972)

Frenzy (1972)

'Frenzy' is dark, even by Hitchcock standards. With censors relaxing standards for subject matter like brutal murder and nudity, it seemed that 'Frenzy' provided sort of a sandbox of play things that up until now, Hitchcock was only allowed to hint at. In 'Psycho,' another movie about a psychopathic killer, Hitchcock had to use the magic of editing to suggest murder and nudity because the censors wouldn't allow him to actually show it. In 'Frenzy' he lets loose, creating the kind of graphic serial killer movie he could only have dreamed about in the early part of his career.

Never one to shy away from lurid subject matter, Hitchcock seemed to embrace the depravity of 'Frenzy.' It isn't your normal serial killer movie either. This is a movie intended to dissect the mind behind the madness, all the while playing on one of Hitchcock's favorite themes: the wrongfully accused man.

Richard Blaney (Jon Finch) is the poor man who is destined to be the one wrongfully accused. There's a murderer running around London, and he's strangling women with neckties. He's a sexual deviant. He rapes the women, strangles them, and then disposes of their bodies.
Blaney, like many Hitchcock leading men, is simply in the wrong place at the wrong time...

Language: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America)
Subtitles: English SDH, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish

Extras:

The Story of Frenzy (SD, 45 minutes): An in-depth documentary where cast and crew get to reminisce about their time on the movie and what it was like working with Hitchcock. Also discussed is the violent nature of the film and how Hitch really wanted to go as far as he could with it.

Production Photographs (SD, 17 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads, production photos and more.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 3 minutes). A theatrical trailer is included here with Hitchcock introducing the movie after floating on his back in the River Thames.


Family Plot (1976)

Family Plot (1976)

When the final credits role on 'Family Plot,' it's hard to fathom that it was Hitchcock's final movie before his death in 1980. It was a complete 180-degree turn from the dark, menacing serial killer movie he had made in 1972. 'Frenzy' featured graphic nudity and some scenes of homicide that are still as brutal and visceral as they've ever been. 'Family Plot,' on the other hand, has much more in common with a movie like 'Clue' than any of Hitchcock's darker films. That's what makes it so fun though. Combining the comedic elements of 'The Trouble with Harry' and sandwiching them together with the suspenseful elements of 'Rear Window' Hitchcock crafted a playful caper for his final film.

There's a lot going on in 'Family Plot.' It's a story filled with kidnappings, ransomed diamonds, huge fortunes, lost heirs, and psychic tomfoolery. Blanche Tyler (Barbra Harris) is a psychic. Well, she purports to be one, but she simply swindles people out of money from information she learns. Her informant is George Lumley (Dern), who drives taxis and investigates for his girlfriend Blanche. In a seemingly unrelated plotline, professional kidnappers are stashing people in a secret room in their basement until their ransoms are paid in diamonds. Arthur Adamson (William Devane) appears to be a respectable jeweler, but has ambitions of ransoming on the side. He uses Fran (Karen Black) as his accomplice in the crimes. Soon these two stories will converge...

Language: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Spanish (Latin America)
Subtitles: English SDH, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish

Extras:

Plotting Family Plot (SD, 48 minutes): Pat Hitchcock O'Donnell, assistant director Howard G. Kazanjian (who doggedly pursued the director before landing the job), Universal head of production Hilton Green, set designer Henry Bumstead, composer John Williams and actors Bruce Dern, Karen Black and William Devane discuss Hitchcock's final film, its dialogue and innuendo, comedy, casting and on-set anecdotes, as well as Hitch and his wife's failing health, his realization that Family Plot would be his last film and his retirement.

Storyboards: The Chase Scene (SD, 9 minutes): A series of storyboards.

Production Photographs (SD, 15 minutes): Movie posters, vintage ads and production photos.

Theatrical Trailer (SD, 3 minutes). Another great trailer featuring an introduction from Hitchcock.

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